(d) benefits must not impose excessive burdens on the applicant and affect the viability of the project; and the nature of the benefits within the scope of the IBA may also have an impact on the negotiation process. Many Aboriginal communities see resource development as a means of meeting the community`s persistent needs, such as. B deficits in infrastructure and social services29. In addition, investments in social services such as housing, family counselling and child care can offset the potentially negative effects of resource developments on the Community.30 However, IICs tend to focus more on economic benefits, such as employment and business development opportunities. , and not exclusively on social benefits. Some proponents of the project have refused to accept social benefits in CCIs, which are often seen as a government responsibility.31 Differences between the parties` expectations of the content of an IBA can lead to lengthy negotiations. These delays can be particularly difficult if there is no obvious use of deadlocked negotiations.32 While the toolkit focuses primarily on the mining industry, many of the themes and processes in the toolkit are relevant to agreements in other industrial sectors and contexts, including protected areas. , oil and gas, hydropower and forestry. The goal of the toolkit is to help communities, negotiators and consultants reach positive agreements for Aboriginal communities. Ritchie`s point is illustrated by recent case law. In Ktunaxa,[94] the court unanimously ruled that the requirement to consult a sacred land ski resort was met in large part because of the negotiation of an impact management and welfare agreement (IMBA) between the promoter and the community that is challenging it.

In both Ka`a`gee Tu[96] and Prophet River,[97] a consultation process with the Crown delegation on "socio-economic agreements" and ibAs between First Nations and supporters was deemed sufficient to fulfill its duty. As mentioned above, each IBA is unique based on the needs and needs of the parties and the impact of the project. An IBA should be tailored to the specific circumstances and needs of the participating First Nations community, which should be offset by the project proponent`s ability to provide benefits. Ultimately, the parties to the negotiations should use an IBA as a useful means of confirming that the First Nations group will be properly consulted and properly considered during the negotiation process. While the Crown is responsible for consultation, it is up to the project proponents to negotiate IBAs to provide adequate and individual housing. The content of Nunavut`s IBAs is almost legislative, both in the scope of their provisions and in the extent of their effects. Although IAAs are technically regarded as private law contracts, they may prescripte to the public law category, in which transparency and accountability are fundamental principles; The following resources and links have been established to provide additional support to First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities working on reflection and social benefit agreements. These resources include national and international repositories and instruments focused on issues such as mining, including industry. These provisions provide that the project provides benefits to First Nations in exchange for First Nations support for the project and legal certainty. Community capacity challenges can also have an impact on the implementation of the IBA and on the transfer of long-term benefits to Aboriginal communities. As previously mentioned, IBAs may include training and procurement rules for businesses to help communities achieve long-term economic prosperity and well-being33.

(d) benefits must not impose excessive burdens on the applicant and affect the viability of the project; and the nature of the benefits within the scope of the IBA may also have an impact on the negotiation process. Many Aboriginal communities see resource development as a means of meeting the community`s persistent needs, such as. B deficits in infrastructure and social services29. In addition, investments in social services such as housing, family counselling and child care can offset the potentially negative effects of resource developments on the Community.30 However, IICs tend to focus more on economic benefits, such as employment and business development opportunities. , and not exclusively on social benefits. Some proponents of the project have refused to accept social benefits in CCIs, which are often seen as a government responsibility.31 Differences between the parties` expectations of the content of an IBA can lead to lengthy negotiations. These delays can be particularly difficult if there is no obvious use of deadlocked negotiations.32 While the toolkit focuses primarily on the mining industry, many of the themes and processes in the toolkit are relevant to agreements in other industrial sectors and contexts, including protected areas. , oil and gas, hydropower and forestry. The goal of the toolkit is to help communities, negotiators and consultants reach positive agreements for Aboriginal communities. Ritchie`s point is illustrated by recent case law. In Ktunaxa,[94] the court unanimously ruled that the requirement to consult a sacred land ski resort was met in large part because of the negotiation of an impact management and welfare agreement (IMBA) between the promoter and the community that is challenging it.

In both Ka`a`gee Tu[96] and Prophet River,[97] a consultation process with the Crown delegation on "socio-economic agreements" and ibAs between First Nations and supporters was deemed sufficient to fulfill its duty. As mentioned above, each IBA is unique based on the needs and needs of the parties and the impact of the project. An IBA should be tailored to the specific circumstances and needs of the participating First Nations community, which should be offset by the project proponent`s ability to provide benefits. Ultimately, the parties to the negotiations should use an IBA as a useful means of confirming that the First Nations group will be properly consulted and properly considered during the negotiation process. While the Crown is responsible for consultation, it is up to the project proponents to negotiate IBAs to provide adequate and individual housing. The content of Nunavut`s IBAs is almost legislative, both in the scope of their provisions and in the extent of their effects. Although IAAs are technically regarded as private law contracts, they may prescripte to the public law category, in which transparency and accountability are fundamental principles; The following resources and links have been established to provide additional support to First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities working on reflection and social benefit agreements. These resources include national and international repositories and instruments focused on issues such as mining, including industry. These provisions provide that the project provides benefits to First Nations in exchange for First Nations support for the project and legal certainty. Community capacity challenges can also have an impact on the implementation of the IBA and on the transfer of long-term benefits to Aboriginal communities. As previously mentioned, IBAs may include training and procurement rules for businesses to help communities achieve long-term economic prosperity and well-being33.

(d) benefits must not impose excessive burdens on the applicant and affect the viability of the project; and the nature of the benefits within the scope of the IBA may also have an impact on the negotiation process. Many Aboriginal communities see resource development as a means of meeting the community`s persistent needs, such as. B deficits in infrastructure and social services29. In addition, investments in social services such as housing, family counselling and child care can offset the potentially negative effects of resource developments on the Community.30 However, IICs tend to focus more on economic benefits, such as employment and business development opportunities. , and not exclusively on social benefits. Some proponents of the project have refused to accept social benefits in CCIs, which are often seen as a government responsibility.31 Differences between the parties` expectations of the content of an IBA can lead to lengthy negotiations. These delays can be particularly difficult if there is no obvious use of deadlocked negotiations.32 While the toolkit focuses primarily on the mining industry, many of the themes and processes in the toolkit are relevant to agreements in other industrial sectors and contexts, including protected areas. , oil and gas, hydropower and forestry. The goal of the toolkit is to help communities, negotiators and consultants reach positive agreements for Aboriginal communities. Ritchie`s point is illustrated by recent case law. In Ktunaxa,[94] the court unanimously ruled that the requirement to consult a sacred land ski resort was met in large part because of the negotiation of an impact management and welfare agreement (IMBA) between the promoter and the community that is challenging it.

In both Ka`a`gee Tu[96] and Prophet River,[97] a consultation process with the Crown delegation on "socio-economic agreements" and ibAs between First Nations and supporters was deemed sufficient to fulfill its duty. As mentioned above, each IBA is unique based on the needs and needs of the parties and the impact of the project. An IBA should be tailored to the specific circumstances and needs of the participating First Nations community, which should be offset by the project proponent`s ability to provide benefits. Ultimately, the parties to the negotiations should use an IBA as a useful means of confirming that the First Nations group will be properly consulted and properly considered during the negotiation process. While the Crown is responsible for consultation, it is up to the project proponents to negotiate IBAs to provide adequate and individual housing. The content of Nunavut`s IBAs is almost legislative, both in the scope of their provisions and in the extent of their effects. Although IAAs are technically regarded as private law contracts, they may prescripte to the public law category, in which transparency and accountability are fundamental principles; The following resources and links have been established to provide additional support to First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities working on reflection and social benefit agreements. These resources include national and international repositories and instruments focused on issues such as mining, including industry. These provisions provide that the project provides benefits to First Nations in exchange for First Nations support for the project and legal certainty. Community capacity challenges can also have an impact on the implementation of the IBA and on the transfer of long-term benefits to Aboriginal communities. As previously mentioned, IBAs may include training and procurement rules for businesses to help communities achieve long-term economic prosperity and well-being33.

(d) benefits must not impose excessive burdens on the applicant and affect the viability of the project; and the nature of the benefits within the scope of the IBA may also have an impact on the negotiation process. Many Aboriginal communities see resource development as a means of meeting the community`s persistent needs, such as. B deficits in infrastructure and social services29. In addition, investments in social services such as housing, family counselling and child care can offset the potentially negative effects of resource developments on the Community.30 However, IICs tend to focus more on economic benefits, such as employment and business development opportunities. , and not exclusively on social benefits. Some proponents of the project have refused to accept social benefits in CCIs, which are often seen as a government responsibility.31 Differences between the parties` expectations of the content of an IBA can lead to lengthy negotiations. These delays can be particularly difficult if there is no obvious use of deadlocked negotiations.32 While the toolkit focuses primarily on the mining industry, many of the themes and processes in the toolkit are relevant to agreements in other industrial sectors and contexts, including protected areas. , oil and gas, hydropower and forestry. The goal of the toolkit is to help communities, negotiators and consultants reach positive agreements for Aboriginal communities. Ritchie`s point is illustrated by recent case law. In Ktunaxa,[94] the court unanimously ruled that the requirement to consult a sacred land ski resort was met in large part because of the negotiation of an impact management and welfare agreement (IMBA) between the promoter and the community that is challenging it.

In both Ka`a`gee Tu[96] and Prophet River,[97] a consultation process with the Crown delegation on "socio-economic agreements" and ibAs between First Nations and supporters was deemed sufficient to fulfill its duty. As mentioned above, each IBA is unique based on the needs and needs of the parties and the impact of the project. An IBA should be tailored to the specific circumstances and needs of the participating First Nations community, which should be offset by the project proponent`s ability to provide benefits. Ultimately, the parties to the negotiations should use an IBA as a useful means of confirming that the First Nations group will be properly consulted and properly considered during the negotiation process. While the Crown is responsible for consultation, it is up to the project proponents to negotiate IBAs to provide adequate and individual housing. The content of Nunavut`s IBAs is almost legislative, both in the scope of their provisions and in the extent of their effects. Although IAAs are technically regarded as private law contracts, they may prescripte to the public law category, in which transparency and accountability are fundamental principles; The following resources and links have been established to provide additional support to First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities working on reflection and social benefit agreements. These resources include national and international repositories and instruments focused on issues such as mining, including industry. These provisions provide that the project provides benefits to First Nations in exchange for First Nations support for the project and legal certainty. Community capacity challenges can also have an impact on the implementation of the IBA and on the transfer of long-term benefits to Aboriginal communities. As previously mentioned, IBAs may include training and procurement rules for businesses to help communities achieve long-term economic prosperity and well-being33.